Tag Archives: Science Fiction

On ‘Geek Girls’

Here are two articles from one Alyssa Rosenberg in Slate. The first is about how there is no such thing as “fake geek girls”. The second advocates feminists in science fiction push their ideology on the SFWA and push out and censoring established male SF writers.

Of course, Alyssa sees no contradiction between these two asserations; in fact, linking to the former article in the latter.

As someone who enjoys SF, among a variety of other nerdy hobbies, I would like to comment on this.

I have no problem with women writing SF, reading SF, or participating in any other nerdy activities. I also have no problem with women who participate in some nerdy activities and not others, for whatever reasons. There’s nothing wrong with a girl (or a guy) who likes Dr. Who, but doesn’t like D&D.

My problem is not women who engage in whatever nerdy activities they enjoy to whatever extent they like and avoid what they don’t. My problem, is that some women, turn what should be some enjoyable hobby into a crusade to destroy what others enjoy.

That is where the ‘fake geek girl’ meme comes from. It has little to do with women who enjoy or not enjoy certain nerdy activities and everything to do with women acting like they enjoy geeky activities while actively try to destroy those same geeky activities.

The ‘fake geek girl’ is not the girl who likes Dr. Who but doesn’t care for BSG; it’s the girl who watches Dr. Who then demands the next Dr. Who should be a woman. (Dr. Who was just an example I saw recently, I don’t watch the show and don’t really care). It’s the girl who actively tries to destroy a nerdy activity so whatever BS political crusade they happen to be on at the time who is the ‘fake geek girl’.

Why do some women, who claim to love whatever nerdy activity they are talking about, insist on changing the very nature of what they profess to love? If the geeky activity a women claims to love is only acceptable to her if it is entirely changed, then she is definitionally a ‘fake geek girl’.

Why can’t you just enjoy something for what it is? If you don’t enjoy it, then simply avoid it rather than trying to change it.

The question is not, “whose participation in genre fiction is more valid?”

The true question is, “why the hell won’t you leave us alone?”

If ‘women like SF’, but are put off by cheesecake in SF or other sf tropes, then why don’t women write their own SF without cheesecake, then leave those who enjoy cheesecake SF alone?

If ‘women like comics’, but don’t like heroines with skintight costumes, then why don’t they write their own comics with heroines portrayed however they want, and leave Powergirl alone?

If ‘women like video games’, but don’t like damsels in distress, then why don’t they create and sell their own video games with ‘strong, independent women’ and leave Princess Peach alone?

But the feminists, in their usual entitled, narcissistic uselessness can not leave alone. Instead of creating their own characters, their own games, their own stories, they have to attack everyone elses’. They demand the entire industry of nerdy entertainment cater to them and their preferences because in their narcissism, only the feminists’ desires matter; fuck those loser male nerds who built the entire industry.

Goddess forbid that males should be allowed to enjoy what they enjoy without some hateful harpy hectoring them for it.

Are they so thoroughly incompetent they can not make nerdy entertainment that fits their preferences and others would enjoy, but must rather content themselves with destroying what everyone else enjoys?

Are they such emotionally fragile and pathetic people, that they can not live and let live, but must muster up umbrage every time someone enjoys something they don’t like?

Mario would not be Mario if he wasn’t rescuing Princess Peach. If you don’t like it, don’t try to change Mario to ruin him for everyone else, go make your own game where Maria rescues Prince Apple. If the idea is good, people will buy it, if not, they won’t.

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Sidenote: Vox has had some fun with the SFWA on this issue. I’ll link the series here, as it is an enjoyable read, as most of Vox’ rabbit-poking is.
http://voxday.blogspot.ca/2013/06/women-ruin-everything-sfwa-edition.html
http://voxday.blogspot.ca/2013/06/the-dangerous-vision-of-sfwa.html
http://voxday.blogspot.ca/2013/06/sfwa-burns-witch.html
http://voxday.blogspot.ca/2013/06/seriously-fascist-womens-association.html
http://voxday.blogspot.ca/2013/06/stampeding-herd.html
http://voxday.blogspot.ca/2013/06/a-black-female-fantasist.html
http://voxday.blogspot.ca/2013/06/sfwa-forum-moderated-posts.html
http://voxday.blogspot.ca/2013/06/sf-vs-science.html
http://voxday.blogspot.ca/2013/06/rejecting-lie.html


The Bookshelf: As I Walk These Broken Roads

Aurini over at Stares at the World has written a post-apocalyptic novel called As I Walk These Broken Roads. I don’t normally review the fiction I read on here, but Aurini is a part of the manosphere/alt-right blogosphere, so I thinks it’s relevant to the blog.

The books is set in post-nuclear holocaust Ontario. The setting is enjoyable; Aurini built a believeable post-apocalyptic world to set his story in. I look forward to the rest of the series where the origins of this world are more fully explored.

The book centres around Wentworth, a mysterious, deadly loner who beings his quest wandering in the figurative desert. Wentworth is a solid, but not particularly original, take on the hypercompetent anti-hero archetype. I like that her was a realistically hypercompetent anti-hero. He never becomes a self-parody and remains solidly in the realm of beleivability, which given the nature of the setting is important. A James Bond or Mike Harmon type would’ve been out of place. As the story progresses Wentworth becomes more fleshed out and takes on more depth. He’s a strong lead for the book.

The other main character is Raxx, a mechanic in a small-town who hasn’t been fully accepted into his adopted home. He has somewhat more depth than Wentworth and complement the main character quite well. Overall, he’s a good character; not as “cool” as Wentworth, but more relatable and “human”.

The villains fit their purposes well and are fairly well developed; their motivations and actions are heinous and interesting, but never unbeleivable. The other minor characters don’t have much depth, but they fill their roles adequately.

Overall, the book is well written. Aurini writes in a straight-forward style with just enough style to pull you in. The action scenes are realistic and well-written. The dialogue is solid and beleivable, while the philosophical conversations are interseting, but never extend too long or interfere with the story.

The book’s story is divided into three general arcs:

The first arc extends over the first few chapters and introduces the setting and characters. This arc is solid and moderately entertaining but not overly engrossing. It functions well as an introduction and leads nicely into the main arc, but is somewhat lacking a certain je ne sais quoi. It feels like Aurini was finding his fiction writing style during this arc.

The second arc comprises the bulk of the book and contains the main storyline. The story picks up here and it was thoroughly enjoyable. The story and villains are excellent. This arc is fantastic, it read like Aurini really got the hang of writing fiction by this point. Whatever the first little arc was missing, Aurini found it here.

The third arc comprises the last few chapters. I thought it was somewhat unnecessary, the book should really have ended after the main storyline was resolved with maybe a short epilogue.  The last part extends the book with adding much to it; I started to lose interest and left the book for a few days, before finishing off the last couple chapters. It seems to have been included as a set-up for the next book in the series, but I think a short epilogue would have set the stage better.

Overall, the book was really good output by Aurini. It started wobbly, but really picked up steam and I ended up thoroughly enjoying it. I am definitely purchasing the next book in the series whenever Aurini releases it.

Recommendation:

This was a good book; if you like the genre or the concept interests you, pick the book up. It is a entertaining read and definitely worth the time investment.

If you don’t care for post-apocalyptic science fiction and the concept of the book doesn’t interest you, the book probably won’t change your mind.